Friday, October 20, 2017

Yazmin, resiliency and determination

Sean Petty and Yazmin Aguirre - photo from her FB page.  
It’s the smile that catches your attention then her upbeat personality pulls you in to her orbit - Yazmin Aguirre Rivera.

Originally from Tamaulipas and Nuevo León in the northern part of Mexico her family, mom, dad, and two sisters now live in Mexico City. She moved to the Caribbean side of Mexico about thirteen years ago working in both Cancun and on Isla Mujeres. Many of you will know her as the capable rental manager for Isla Mujeres Vacations, a company created in 2014 by Susan Marchon, of Mundaca Realty, and Yazmin.
Yazmin  Dia De La Independencia! 
We first met Yazmin a few years ago at the monthly Art Fair in the square. She happened to be walking by a display of Catrinas, the fancy-dress Day of the Dead skeletons, that are popular at the end of October and beginning of November. The vendor was one of her friends and Yazmin playfully started to hype the Catrinas creating interest from the crowd and resulting in a few sales. It was all light-hearted fun, smiles and laughter. That’s the Yazmin we know.  
So, about eighteen months ago when I was beginning to write my first novel in the Isla Mujeres Mystery series, I asked Yazmin Aguirre if she would mind me using a name similar to hers, Yasmin Medina, for one of the main characters. The character from my novel has golden streaks through her dark curly hair, and deep green eyes like La Trigueña the young Maya woman whom pirate Fermin Mundaca lusted after in the 1870’s. I wanted the character to have a great smile and curly hair, and the only name that seemed to fit was Yasmin. I tried a dozen other names, and just kept coming back to the same one. But as I said to Yazmin Aguirre, she’s not you. My character is shyer and wrestles with her role as a smart, determined woman in a very macho-society.
Yazmin - from her FB page 
When Yazmin read the first draft of Treasure Isla, she laughed, and said, “Well that could have been me when I was younger and shy.”  
Lawrie and I smiled at that thought. Yazmin shy? We just couldn’t see it. She’s confident, bold, caring and has an amazing energy for helping others. While she was in Mexico City recovering from major surgery for colon cancer, she was also fundraising for the victims of the two major earthquakes and the volcano eruption that was triggered by the earthquakes.
On the island she is an active promoter of the Isla Mujeres Scholarship program, providing financial assistance to students. Yazmin is also deeply involved with the annual Island Time Musical Festival. The proceeds from the six-day event go to the Little Yellow School House, a local facility for children with developmental problems.
Yazmin teaching the kids - Pamela Ballo photo
And for fun she teaches yoga, a combination of Hatha and Vinyasa practices, plus specializing in instructing children. Yazmin recently told me that once she has ‘kicked the cancer’s butt’ she plans to offer free lessons for local kids in Las Glorias as she said, a karma payback.  
Now it Yazmin’s turn to get a helping hand from her many friends and acquaintances. Her medical bills will exceed $60,000.00 USD for her cancer treatments plus the six rounds of chemo therapy. Generous donations are happening hourly but there is still a long way to go.
Yazmin - Andrea Luff photo
One islander came up with an inventive way to raise more money for Yazmin. Laurence Levy otherwise known as the creative owner-chef of Lolo Lorena’s Restaurant on Isla Mujeres was planning to donate $250, but then she had the idea to turn that $250 into $2500 with a 7 course dinner, all proceeds going to Yazmin’s gofundme campaign. And she did, all while confined to a wheelchair the result of her accident several years ago. Islanders continue to amaze us with their resiliency and determination.
So, if you are interested in helping Yazmin ‘kick cancer’s butt’ here’s how:
There is a Go Fund Me account set up on the internet to facilitate donations. The link is added below. https://www.gofundme.com/yazmin-battle-against-cancer
Donations can also be made anytime at Javi’s Cantina on Juarez Avenue on Isla (Javi’s will be closed November 1st to 15th for kitchen renovations.)

And please share this blog post on your social network accounts; Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Goggle Plus.
That's another good thing about living here, everyone (locals, ex-pats, tourists, and friends) are willing to pitch in and do what they can to help.
Cheers from paradise
Lynda & Lawrie









CA review on September 26, 2017


Yasmin and Jessica are back and the gold they found in Treasure Isla is still haunting them, especially when Carlos, their boss at the Loco Lobo, and Yasmin’s new lover, is kidnapped. No spoilers here, but his captivity and the girls’ efforts to free him, with the help of Carlos’s pals—including local Isla Mujeres fishermen and a Mexico City cop—are the crux of this fast-paced story. Lock has created not only a compelling and authentic setting, but a well-developed ensemble cast. The next Isla mystery can’t come fast enough.


Saturday, October 14, 2017

Just in case you missed it!


There's Trouble on Isla, Big Trouble!
  

Book #2 in the Isla Mujeres Mystery Series

By CA reviews on September 26, 2017

Yasmin and Jessica are back and the gold they found in Treasure Isla is still haunting them, especially when Carlos, their boss at the Loco Lobo, and Yasmin’s new lover, is kidnapped. No spoilers here, but his captivity and the girls’ efforts to free him, with the help of Carlos’s pals—including local Isla Mujeres fishermen and a Mexico City cop—are the crux of this fast-paced story. Lock has created not only a compelling and authentic setting, but a well-developed ensemble cast. The next Isla mystery can’t come fast enough.

Available on Amazon e-books $2.99 USD

Trouble Isla on Amazon


 Treasure Isla 
By CA reviews on September 26, 2017


This was a truly fun in the sun kind of mystery, with an authenticity that was simply captivating. Set on the island called Isla Mujeres, not far from the better-known Mexican resort of Cancun, it follows the misadventures of two girlfriends, who on a drunken binge manage to wander onto the grounds of a cemetery and find a treasure map stuck in a crevice of an old pirate tomb. Jessica, from Canada, and local pal Yasmin both work at a tourist bar/restaurant called the Loco Lobo. Soon their boss Carlos and a handsome attorney named Luis are involved in the girls’ illegal hunt for pirate gold. Toss in a bad dude running from a string of crimes in Key West, and it’s the start of an addictive new mystery series.

Book #1 Isla Mujeres Mystery Series
            $2.99 USD on most e-book distribution systems.

Here are the links:

Treasure Isla on Amazon

Treasure Isla on Smashwords


Treasure Isla on Kobo Books


Treasure Isla on iTunes

Treasure Isla on Barnes and Noble Nook

Friday, October 13, 2017

Tropical Storm/Hurricane Nate – gave us a pass


Boarding up for TS Nate.  
Normally a bit of rough weather doesn’t bother us. We’re Canadian and have experienced snowy blizzards and drenching rain storms. But I confess I’m not a fan of tropical storms that are teetering on the edge of being classified as a hurricane.
I don’t mind wind, but I really don’t like the high velocity winds of a tormenta. Sadly though, when this recent storm, TS Nate, blasted over the mountainous countries of Costa Rica and Nicaragua it was the excessive rainfall that caused the deaths of twenty-two people.
Since we live at the edge of the ocean and TS Nate was forecast to pass directly over this flat, little sandbar of an island we obsessively clicked on the NOAA site and several internet weather channels checking predicted rainfall, storm surge, and wind speeds.
On Wednesday it became pretty clear we were going to get hit.
By Thursday morning we had dragged everything inside our little casa; two sun loungers, a small sofa and two chairs, glass topped tables, stacks of big cushions for the two larger sofas, and anything small enough to become an airborne hazard. 
We tied down garden hoses to prevent them whipping around in the wind, and pushed plant pots into tight huddles. 
I made up a couple of dozen sandbags to block the rain from entering under our doors, especially our bedroom door which has an outside entrance onto an open deck.
New house a bit north of ours boarded up.
We had extra bottles of water, gas in the golf cart, easy to prepare food for us and the pets, and cash in case the power was off for a few days making ATM’s useless. (By now we are feeling like the characters in the novel that I am writing, Tormenta Isla, who had to do all the same prep work!)
Then, exactly as our friends Tony Garcia and Isauro Martinez described many boat owners prepared for the storm/hurricane by moving their vessels deep into Laguna Makax. The Caribe line of passenger boats from Cozumel brought their three good-sized vessels to Isla and docked them at the municipal wharf next to the car ferry. Presumably that dock is more sheltered than the ones at Cozumel. Even the car ferry and the Ultramar passenger ferries shut down early.
Caribe Ferry - normally located in Cozumel
It was an eerie feeling driving along the island’s shoreline which normally bustles with boats, islanders and tourists. Every public or private wharf from Velasquez Restaurante, near the north end of the island, to the car ferry were empty and all of the oceanfront restaurants were closed. Every tour, pleasure, or work boat had been moved to Laguna Makax, or dragged high up on the beach and securely tied to nearby palm trees.

Hotel shuttered on main floor
Many businesses were closed so that their staff would be safely at home before the predicted late-Friday afternoon arrival of the storm. Doors and windows were covered by pieces of wood or cortinas, the accordion-style hurricane shutters.
A light rain damped the streets and we decided it was time to hunker down with our pets and a good bottle of wine. We read, we sipped wine, we waited, and we checked the internet. The predicted rainfall was for around 95mm or 4 inches although TS Nate had dumped 510 mm or about 20 inches of rain on Central America. The wind-speed was going to touch on a Category 1 Hurricane of 120 kilometers per hour, about 74 miles an hour.
Wharf at Bally Hoo - empty, restaurant closed.
The afternoon turned into evening, and still no rain or wind. 
Then, remarkably we fell asleep for two hours. I usually lay awake during storms listening the sounds of the house; the rattle of the screen on our windows, the creak of the patio doors as the wind pushes against it, and the banging of something not tightly secured.
At ten in the evening both Lawrie and I woke up, to silence. No wind. No rain. Nothing. We checked the internet again. It looked as if the storm now called Hurricane Nate had moved about ten miles east, closer to Cuba. It had passed by us. That was a big relief to everyone. Facebook pages were soon littered with jokes about the over-reaction and the huge amount of prep work for a non-event.
M&J's buttoned up for TS Nate
But as one of our friends said:
“They just don’t understand what it feels like to lose everything and to not have insurance. To have your only vehicle damaged, whether it was a moto or an old car it was still your only transportation. To worry about the lives of your family, your friends, and yourself. To step out of your home and see the damage done to your community and know that it could be days or weeks before everything is back to some type of normal. In the meantime people scramble to make a living and to feed their children. It’s difficult, very difficult. So what if we over-prepared, better that then homeless.”
We’d happily do the same preparations again especially if it works as a lucky charm and keeps the tormenta away. 
Although it seems that when our nearby neighbours Rob and Julie Goth board over their small windows, the ones without the cortinas, we are guaranteed to get a pass from the hurricane.
We’re back to sunny and hot weather and waiting on the return of our various Canadian, American and European neighbours for the busy October to April social season. 
There goes the diet!
Cheers from paradise
Lynda & Lawrie


 ~


Trouble Isla 5.0 out of 5 stars Fast and furious
CA review on September 26, 2017
Yasmin and Jessica are back and the gold they found in Treasure Isla is still haunting them, especially when Carlos, their boss at the Loco Lobo, and Yasmin’s new lover, is kidnapped. No spoilers here, but his captivity and the girls’ efforts to free him, with the help of Carlos’s pals—including local Isla Mujeres fishermen and a Mexico City cop—are the crux of this fast-paced story. Lock has created not only a compelling and authentic setting, but a well-developed ensemble cast. The next Isla mystery can’t come fast enough.

Book #2 in the Isla Mujeres Mystery Series
Available on Amazon e-books $2.99 USD


 Treasure Isla 
Book #1 Isla Mujeres Mystery Series
            $2.99 USD on most e-book distribution systems.


Here are the links:





Friday, October 6, 2017

Local knowledge - an author’s best resource

We love living in a small community. The people are friendly and willing to share their insider knowledge. 

A few days ago while I was working on Tormenta Isla book #3 of the Isla Mujeres Mystery series, I was stuck for an answer.

I popped a message to two of my island friends, Tony Garcia and Isauro Martinez. Within minutes both guys had responded with oodles of intriguing bits information. How great is that? 


Captain Tony Garcia
Captain Tony is a well-known wedding, special-occasion and island-ambiance photographer. 
He is also a tour boat captain, and judging by the photos on his Facebook page, he’s a terrific chef.
Isauro Martinez is the affable and always smiling owner of Indio’s golf cart rentals. 

Indio was his dad’s nickname, and his is Apache. He always has fun stories to tell about growing up on the island.


Isauro Martinez - Indio Golf Cart Rentals
And then there is Freddy Medina who has been a good friend since we moved to the island. 

In the first novel of the series, Treasure Isla Book, I had one of my main characters, Yasmin Medina, jokingly name the crocodile that lives at the Hacienda Mundaca Park after her fictional cousin Freddy. 

The real Freddy owns the El Arrecife Bar in Centro. He and his five sisters have been fabulous a source of island information and personal stories, especially for our weekly blogs.


Freddy and Yadira - after Christmas parade
Many other islanders and ex-pats have big-heartedly answered questions, contributed bits of information, and recounted funny anecdotes. 

It’s all part of the island colour that I try to bring alive in the novels.

My recent questions went something like this:
What happens to the car ferry during a hurricane?  “It normally is used as a breakwater across Laguna Makax to prevent big waves from destroying all the smaller boats stored in the lagoon.”


Chatting while cleaning the day's catch.
Is the lagoon jammed with boats by the time everyone gets their vessel inside the area?   “They are tight around the edges but not in the center. The center is muddy and if you drop anchor there, the boat would move. Berthed at a marina or tied to the trees is much better.”

What’s the name of the bit of water between Puerto Juarez and Isla Mujeres? “Bahia de Mujeres.”

Morning gossip group - I gave them all a copy of this pic.






You just can’t get that type of information from the internet. (Okay, maybe I could have eventually found the name of the bay on Google.)  

You may be wondering why most of my information comes from men and not women. Maybe because the guys like to gossip, to chat, to chew-the-fat? 

I don't know.  What do you think?

Cheers Lynda & Lawrie





Book #2 in the Isla Mujeres Mystery Series
Available on Amazon e-books $2.99 USD

5.0 out of 5 stars Fast and furious

CA review on September 26, 2017

Yasmin and Jessica are back and the gold they found in Treasure Isla is still haunting them, especially when Carlos, their boss at the Loco Lobo, and Yasmin’s new lover, is kidnapped. No spoilers here, but his captivity and the girls’ efforts to free him, with the help of Carlos’s pals—including local Isla Mujeres fishermen and a Mexico City cop—are the crux of this fast-paced story. Lock has created not only a compelling and authentic setting, but a well-developed ensemble cast. The next Isla mystery can’t come fast enough.


 Treasure Isla 
Book #1 Isla Mujeres Mystery Series
            $2.99 USD on most e-book distribution systems.


Here are the links:








Friday, September 29, 2017

If you are thinking of retiring to Mexico …

Don’t!  Unless you love adventure, living fearlessly, and enjoy diversity.

When we decided to retire to this little island in the Caribbean we’d already had some experience with Mexico. 

I started holidaying in mid-1960s on the western side of the country, Lynda a bit later. (Damn, we should have learned more Spanish than baños and cerveza!)


Love that turquoise-coloured water

We chose Isla Mujeres for a number of reasons. The first hook was the amazing turquoise water, ten years later we are both still mesmerized by the ocean. Another reason was the kind and friendly people. They are an intriguing mix of Mayan, Spanish and several other cultures.

Lynda and I had previously lived on a small island off the coast of British Columbia Canada, and we knew it takes certain mentality to flourish in a remote community. 

Colour and fun during Carnaval 
You have to be handy and inventive as you can’t always call for help any time that you need it. Isla has lots of handymen, who are usually busy doing jobs for other folks and they will get around to you sooner or later, but not always immediately. It isn’t laziness, it is because they are just too busy but it is not polite in this culture to say ‘no’ to anyone. So they agree to help out, mañana. But as the song says: “Mañana doesn’t mean tomorrow, it just means not today.”
Cowboys waiting for another parade to start

We started with a new-build so everything worked for a while, then the salt and humidity started to create problems. 

Stupid little things started to go wrong and I once again became Joe Handyman. Light fixtures rusted. Light sockets corroded. Door locks seized. Door hinges stiffened. Taps seized up with mineral deposits. It’s a never-ending job.

Dia de Independencia

And some other challenges with living in a foreign country:
The first question our American friends ask is, “What do you do for Medical?” We’re Canadian and we had universal health care back in Canada that we took for granted. But after six months of being outside the country we are no longer eligible for coverage. We thought about health insurance but decided against it. Nobody gets out of life alive. Just think of your grandparents, they didn’t have insurance or health plans.

Revolution Day parade 

About a month after moving one of us developed a high fever and bronchitis. We called the local doctor who immediately came to our house, administered a shot, wrote out a prescription for antibiotics and advised bed-rest for a few days. The bill was five hundred pesos, that’s not a lot of money for fast and caring service. We haven’t met any zillionaire doctors in Mexico.

The one thing we didn’t realize, until we left our country, was the officials and politicians would lose interest in helping us solve problems. 
Worker making a Flowery Cross for top of casa 

Yes, we get our pensions direct deposited to our Canadian banks, but it is an ongoing war with the bureaucrats. First it was a withholding tax on my pensions, even though we declare any and all income on our Canadian tax returns. Then it was an eighteen-month wait for Lynda’s pensions to be processed because she had to prove exactly what day we left Canada in 2008. We drove 8500 kilometers from BC to Isla Mujeres, and neither the American nor the Mexican border guards are required to stamp our passports. We had to get personal friends (not family!) and past employers to verify the date that we left the country. We finally got that resolved, and now, we are fighting over the withholding tax on Lynda’s pensions.
Flowery Cross Day May 3rd

Over the years we have discovered that a lot of ex-pats don’t tell their respective governments that they are living outside the country. They keep a mailing address in their original country and it simplifies everything. I guess I’m stupid. I have this honestly streak and went by the book. It has cost us dearly in time, money, and frustration.

Another beautiful sunset


Once Canadians leave the country for more than five years, we lose our right to vote in any elections, so now the politicians don’t care at all about our challenges. 

But, we still have the privilege of paying our Canadian income tax every year. 

According to our American friends, they can still vote but the ex-pats votes are only counted in certain circumstances. Either way it is a bit odd.

Would we make the same decision and retire to Mexico? 
Hell yes! It is an amazing country and culture.  Just remember that you need that sense of adventure.

Your family will always be family, and although you won’t be right next door they will still love you, and trust me – they will visit you.

Cheers
Lawrie

(Lynda’s busy writing Tormenta Isla Book #3 of the Isla Mujeres Mystery Series)

There's Trouble on Isla, Big Trouble!

Book #2 in the Isla Mujeres Mystery Series
Available on Amazon e-books $2.99 USD


 Treasure Isla 
Book #1 Isla Mujeres Mystery Series
            $2.99 USD on most e-book distribution systems.


Here are the links: